Cochlear Implant (CI) Magnet

The purpose of the cochlear (COKE le ar) implant (CI) magnet is to hold the headpiece (coil) in place to transmit sound to the internal device. The entire device has 4 parts: the magnet, headpiece (coil), cable and processor. The CI magnet portion is about the size of a dime.

Before CI surgery, your child will receive medicine to be sure he or she will not feel pain. During surgery, the magnet is inserted just under the scalp, through a slit that is made behind the ear. The area is closed with special stitches that will dissolve by themselves. They do not need to be removed.

Cochlear-Implant-External-Diagram

Cochlear-Implant-External-Diagram

Important things to remember

It is important to know the magnet strength and to consistently check the magnet site when wearing a cochlear implant (CI). If this is not closely monitored, the magnet can cause a skin breakdown leading to infection. If this happens, your child may need another surgery to fix the internal device.cochlear implant
The CI magnet is not to be used to hold the external device on the head. The headpiece may fall off often, so you might feel that the magnet is not strong enough. Your audiologist will closely monitor this and decide if a stronger magnet is needed.

Cochlear implant is an implantable hearing aid device that provides a sense of sound to the person with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss. Unlike the traditional deaf-aid, the working principle of cochlear implant is not amplify the sound, but apply electrical stimulation to the well-functioning auditory nerve in the cochlea.

It is normal for the headpiece to fall off if the patient rubs his or her head on a stroller, car seat, or other object. The headpiece will also fall off if a patient is being very active (for instance, running and jumping). However, it is important that you do not increase the magnet strength without asking your child’s audiologist.
If the magnet is too strong, it can cause the skin to break down. This can lead to infection. If the site becomes infected, the skin can break open, exposing the internal device. Then another surgery might be needed to repair the damage.

If the magnet site becomes infected, the external processor will have to be removed until the site heals. Without the external processor, the patient will not be able to hear until the magnet site heals and it can be worn again. This would require more audiology appointments to reprogram the CI. The magnet site could take days or even months to heal, depending on how severe the skin breakdown is.

How does a cochlear implant work?

It’s for children and adults with sensorineural hearing loss. That condition typically involves damage to tiny hair cells in a part of your inner ear called the cochlea. These hair cells usually pick up the vibrations of sounds and send them to the brain through the auditory nerve. When they’re damaged, sound can’t reach that nerve. A cochlear implant skips the damaged hair cells and sends signals to the auditory nerve directly.
The devices have two parts. One part, the receiver-stimulator, is placed under your skin through surgery. The other, the speech processor, you wear behind your ear like a hearing aid. The outside part is slightly larger than a normal behind-the-ear hearing aid.

Cochlear Implant (CI) Magnet

Cochlear Implant (CI) Magnet

First, a surgeon puts a receiver under your skin behind your ear through a small cut. The receiver is connected to electrodes, which she’ll put into a part of your inner ear called the cochlea. The surgery takes an hour or two, and you’ll probably go home the same day.

The working of cochlear is based on the tonotopy of the cochlea. The hair cells of the deaf person are damaged or reduced due to different lesions, then residues cannot drive auditory nerve normally. For cochlear implant, the electrical stimulation will apply to the auditory nerve directly which skip to the sector of hair cells.
Microphone collect sound, and thenthe information spreads to the speech
Digitalization, filtering and coding by the speech
Digital signal spread to transmission coil through wire, then signal transmit to the receiver and stimulator under the skin.
Decoding by receiver and stimulator.
Electronic signal is passed to specifyposition of the electrode array, and hence stimulate the nerve fibers in the cochlea.
The electronic signal is recognized as sound by the brainafter nerve received the electronic

How does a cochlear implant work

How does a cochlear implant work

When there are sounds around you, the microphone and processor pick them up and change them into electrical impulses. Then the transmitter sends these coded signals to the receiver under your skin. Next, the receiver delivers the signals to the electrodes inside your cochlea. These electrodes stimulate the auditory nerve, which carries the signals to the brain, where you recognize them as sound.

MRI and Cochlear Implants: What to Know
Have you ever had an MRI, or know someone who has? Having an MRI is a routine medical procedure, but when you’re talking about MRI and cochlear implants there are sometimes special considerations that need to be addressed. Read on to find out what these considerations are and why the new MED-EL Cochlear Implant is safer than any other CI during an MRI

The structure of cochlear implant
The cochlear implant system contains internal part and the external
The internal part includes receiver, decoder and stimulator. The internal part will be placed under the skin behind the ear by surgery.
The external partincludes microphone, speech processor and transmitter. The external part is always placed behind the ear.

What is an MRI?
“MRI” stands for “Magnetic Resonance Imaging,” and is a technology that allows doctors to see detailed images of the inside of a person’s body. These images are taken for many reasons, including diagnosing or further investigating a disease or physical condition, as well as following-up after a medical procedure.

As the name implies, a MRI is created with the use of magnets. The strength of an MRI magnet is measured in units called Teslas, and common hospital MRI strengths range from 0.2 Teslas to 3.0 Teslas.

A big benefit of a more powerful MRI, like one that works at 3.0 Teslas, is that it can provide a higher-resolution image. This is important because a higher-resolution image lets the doctor see the imaged area much more clearly, so that he or she can make a better diagnosis or treatment plan.

MRI and Cochlear Implants
So if a higher-power MRI is better, why aren’t they always used for CI recipients? The answer is straightforward: some CIs just aren’t safe to use around higher-power MRIs. This is largely because of the magnets in the MRI and the CI. When these magnets interact with each other, a few things happen: the implant might move, and in some cases the magnet could become dislodged.

Until the CI, there were two ways around this. The first way was to use a lower-power MRI, and the second was to surgically remove the magnet from the implant. Neither of these are ideal options. Lower-power MRIs have less resolution, and removing the magnet requires one surgery before the MRI to remove it and one after to replace it.

MRI and Cochlear Implants What to Know

MRI and Cochlear Implants What to Know

MRI compatible cochlear implant magnet
Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a common medical imaging procedure nowadays, and detailed images of internal organs and tissue will be got relied on the powerful magnet of MRI.

For cochlear implant system, the processor magnet attracts to the internal part’s magnet to hold it in place. Therefore MRI becomes an extremely important issue for cochlear implant users. The significant risk of complications will be carried during MRI, such as pain, discomfort and magnet’s dislocation. In order to avoid the disadvantage influence of the powerful magnetic field (1.5T and 3.0T) to internal cochlear implant magnet, the cochlear implant manufacturers have introduced many solutions to solve MRI safety, includes head bandage and MRI Kit. In fact, how to make self-aligning implant magnet to avert surgery is still mainstream manufacturers. The special magnetization direction and isotropic NdFeB powder has been already used currently.

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